FAQs

What drugs are opioids?

Some examples include: Painkillers such as; morphine, methadone, Buprenorphine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone. Heroin is an illegal opioid.

Common brand names include: OxyContin®, Percocet®, Vicodin®, Percodan®, Tylox® and Demerol®

How do opioids work in the brain?

Opioids attach to receptors in the brain. They send signals to the brain to block pain, slow breathing, and produce a general calming effect. The body naturally creates opioids, but cannot produce enough natural opioids to stop severe or chronic pain nor can it produce enough to cause an overdose.

Opioids target the brain’s reward system by releasing dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter present in regions of the brain that regulate movement, emotion, cognition, motivation, and feelings of pleasure. The overstimulation of this system, produces the euphoric effects sought by people who misuse drugs and teaches them to repeat the behavior.

Why is counseling necessary during treatment?

Addiction is a learned behavior that changes the brain as well. The brain becomes conditioned to want the substance. Through counseling and other behavioral modification we can actually, in some cases, change the brain physically. By changing our environment, starting a new job, new hobbies and friends, all will alter our brain in some way. It is possible to undo some of the changes that occurred while addicted. Therapy will recondition the brain closer to pre-addiction status. This will better prepare patients for a time when they may no longer require medication.

Medication alone can reduce cravings and withdrawal, but recovering from an addictive disorder requires more. Attention to eliminating things in life that cause stress or depression will help minimize the chance of relapse. Disassociating with friends who are in active addiction can be difficult but very necessary.

Counseling/therapy helps the patient rebuild relationships, repair finances, get a job, assume family responsibilities, decrease stress, anxiety and depression, and helps the patient make other meaningful changes in their lives that will allow them to achieve and maintain addiction remission.

How do I know if  Suboxone is right for me?

Suboxone is a safe and effective treatment option that is prescribed to patients who are struggling with an addiction to opioids. Suboxone works by relieving the physical symptoms of withdrawal while also decreasing cravings for continued opioid use.

Can I become addicted to Suboxone?

Due to the chemical makeup of Suboxone, there is a risk for tolerance, dependence and addiction developing should this medication be abused. However, when patients take Suboxone as prescribed within a medication assisted treatment program, the risk for addiction is extremely low.

Will Suboxone show up on a drug screening?

Patients taking Suboxone will not test positive on a drug screen. The use of Suboxone is legal when taken within a licensed medication assisted treatment program under the close supervision of a trained medical professional.

How long will I need to be on Suboxone?

The length of time that a patient will continue on Suboxone will be determined by his or her individual treatment needs. Suboxone is safe for both short- and long-term use and patients may continue using this medication for as long as deemed appropriate by their physician. While some patients continue taking Suboxone long-term, others will only use it for a few months. By working closely with your treatment team, you will be able to determine the appropriate length of time that Suboxone will be of benefit to you.

Does Suboxone interact with other drugs or medications?

The length of time that a patient will continue on Suboxone will be determined by his or her individual treatment needs. Suboxone is safe for both short- and long-term use and patients may continue using this medication for as long as deemed appropriate by their physician. While some patients continue taking Suboxone long-term, others will only use it for a few months. By working closely with your treatment team, you will be able to determine the appropriate length of time that Suboxone will be of benefit to you.

What if I no longer wish to take Suboxone? Can I stop or switch to a different medication?

Although the use of Suboxone is approved safe for long-term use, patients are not required to remain on this medication long-term. Should you and your physician determine that Suboxone is no longer the appropriate fit for your treatment needs, the treatment team will work closely with you in order to safely wean off of this medication. Because patients can experience uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal should the use of Suboxone suddenly cease, slowly tapering off of this medication under the supervision of your physician is necessary.

What is the cost of Suboxone treatment?

The treatment provided at Hope Centers of Central Florida is individualized to meet each patient’s needs. Since your treatment will be customized for you, treatment costs will vary. To talk more about your needs, and to get more information about costs and payment options, please contact our office.